ADS is a GOOD. Right guys/gals?

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    Topic
  • #52510
    mtThrill
    Participant

    Quick highlights:

    • 33 years old.
    • Resting heart rate around 44 bpm. Max in the low 190s.
    • Fast twitch guy. Most of athletic background is sprints, weights, HIIT etc
    • Recent move to hiking/ultra running in the last year
    • Live and train at elevation, around 4.5k ft
    • AeT around 137/138 (when nasal breathing become difficult). AnT around 170.

    I’ve been training my aerobic capacity the last 4 months assuming by AeT was around 145-150 bpm based on perceived effort (this is before reading the book). But nasal breathing becomes labored at around 138 bpm, which means I’ve been training over AeT. A bit surprising, because a lot of my long days (3-8 hours) I average closer to high 140s/lower 150s bpm.

    But this is a good thing, right? My aerobic capacity and ADS is AWFUL. But this means after some retraining, there is a lot of room for improvement to gain speed and endurance, right? If my AeT were much higher, that basically means I’ve hit my “peak”.

    Just trying to make sure I’m thinking about this the right way..

  • Keymaster
    Shashi on #52520

    Welcome to the Uphill Athlete forum.

    But this is a good thing, right? My aerobic capacity and ADS is AWFUL. But this means after some retraining, there is a lot of room for improvement to gain speed and endurance, right?

    Yes!

    To get a better estimate of your Aerobic Threshold (AeT), I would recommend doing a heart rate drift test. Check out this article that has some good information on different ways to assess AeT and the pros/cons of each approach.

    Wish you the best with your training.

    Participant
    russes011 on #52535

    Alternatively, one can just use this article to determine one’s AnT. Multiply your AnT by 0.85–this is the top of your Z2.

    You say your AnT is ‘around’ 170. I presume if you specifically tested it you could get a more accurate value. An AnT of 170 gives you a top of Z2 of 145.

    Perform most of your exercise below 145 (or 0.85 of AnT). Retest your AnT every 3 months or so. Note: time training in Z2 will also allow you perform more and longer work in Z3, as evidenced by a reduction in HR drift in this zone. This, IMO, does not mean you should start training in Z3 by calling it Z2–this would potentially negate the benefits of polarized training. (Understand that my opinion on this matter differs from other more knowledgeable and experienced posters on UA.) I believe you should mostly just train below 0.85 of AnT (or even easier if this doesn’t feel easy on a certain day). With time, one can train faster and faster at this level–as a result of running economy, weight loss, and increasing VO2max, etc. IMO. it may be a better goal to see how fast you can run at 0.85 AnT instead of chasing the HR drift test into Z3 territory.

    — Steve

    Keymaster
    Shashi on #52540

    Steve,

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    Multiply your AnT by 0.85–this is the top of your Z2.

    I would not recommend doing this as we have seen people with ADS have a much lower AeT (top of Z2) than 0.85.

    it may be a better goal to see how fast you can run at 0.85 AnT instead of chasing the HR drift test into Z3 territory.

    An AeT test will end up in Z3, but the AeT test is done every month or maybe every eight weeks depending on the volume of training. Z3 volume as part of the AeT test should not impact the training.

    Participant
    russes011 on #52544

    Thanks Sashi–I hear you.

    Moderator
    Scott Semple on #52617

    Fast twitch guy. Most of athletic background is sprints, weights, HIIT etc

    Where you are on the FT/ST spectrum isn’t determined by activity; it’s genetic. There are some activity indicators, but a lactate test for anaerobic capacity is the cheapest test method.

    But this means after some retraining, there is a lot of room for improvement to gain speed and endurance, right?

    Yes, tons.

    If my AeT were much higher, that basically means I’ve hit my “peak”.

    No, not at all.

    Once threshold HRs stop converging (the smallest gap I’ve seen is just less than 5%), you’ll have years worth (perhaps a decade) of threshold speed improvement to do. (HR is the tail, speed is the dog.)

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