What's the UA approach to nutrition?

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #28086
    nullkru
    Participant

    Hi Folks,
    out of curiosity how does your “diet”/approach to food look like? Do you track your meals? Special fasting protocols? Special goto foods?

    At the moment for me:
    – Almost all my morning WO are fasted (at least 7-8h) since last meal/snack.
    – Post workout a small snack (protein/carbs) and then dinner. (Usually Protein, some carbs and alot of salad/veggies)
    – dinner is mostly more or less identical to lunch.
    – Snacks: fruits, nuts, seeds, salt sticks

    i eat alot of cheese (i’m swiss) and try to avoid eating too much meat. In the past i was more on a low carb side but developed a bit of an unhealthy relationship with food. which may increased the risk of injury for me (stress fracture early this year/RED-S type of symptoms).
    Also definitely have a sweet tooth and snack on gummi stuff ๐Ÿ™‚

    good training and a nice day — mirko

Posted In: Nutrition

  • Keymaster
    Scott Johnston on #28410

    There is no hard and fast UA nutrition strategy. Diet is very personal and what works for one person might be a disaster for someone else. We are all omnivores and try to eat fairly basic food with minimal processing. Meat, chicken and fish, dairy provide the protein, Fresh fruits and veggies for micro nutrients and card. Grains provide additional carbs and add to the simplicity and yumminess factor. Not rocket science really.

    Something to keep in mind about diet is that humans are omnivores, meaning we can and do get by well on virtually any type of diet. The US 100mile record is held by Zach Bitter and he is a carnivore. Clear on the other end of the spectrum ultra running legend Scot Jurik is a vegan.
    I have sat with Kilian while he downed copious quantities of sugary pastries for breakfast before a workout.

    We do believe that fat adaptation is a benefit in ultra long events (more than a few hours continuous movement). People training a high volume (>15 hours/week) will be come fat adapted with little to no dietary restrictions. Those training under 10 hours/week can boost the fat adaptation process with some simple dietary manipulations like fasted morning aerobic workouts and restricting carbs a bit.

    I hope this helps.
    Scott

    Keymaster
    Steve House on #28519

    Mirko: Here are the most recent articles we’ve posted on this subject:
    https://uphillathlete.com/category/nutrition/

    Participant
    nullkru on #28575

    First of all thank you for your reply!
    I may titled the post a bit wrong. I was searching to get some ideas. How the folks in here approach nutrition. More from a personal side. I’m aware that this topic really depends on the individual.
    I think i just need some inspiration to fix my sugary diet ๐Ÿ™‚

    Have a great day.

    Participant
    briguy on #28581

    I know from experience, cutting out sugary foods is tough! But the more you cut out, and manage to get through the craving period, the easier it gets over time.

    It’s just like training, you need to figure out your weaknesses and target them. Snacking and after-dinner desserts are mine.

    Participant
    deadpoint on #28641

    One approach to breaking your “junk food” addiction is Phil Maffetone’s 2 Week Test. The first 4-6 days are the most difficult, primary sugar/carb withdrawal, and then it goes from easier to no cravings. If you go down this road then do not do anything other than easy/short exercise or you will bonk hard, especially if you primarily fuel yourself on carbs. I made that mistake once and it was very unpleasant.

    Carbohydrate Intolerance and the Two-Week Test

    Participant
    John S on #29156

    As you say Mirko, highly individual! But for me, as a weekend warrior, I don’t geek out too much on nutrition. I have a diet probably reasonably similar to yourself amd that works fine for me.
    I have never had a paricularly sweet tooth, but I find that if I make the effort to make a tasty dinner (rather than just throwing something together) I am less inclined to want a sweet dessert afterwards.
    As I have gotten fitter amd more fat adapted (through fasted workouts), my consumption of sugary snacks whilst being active has dropped markedly. Climbing and ski touring I now snack on cheeses, salamis, and home baked savoury slices. With a chocolate bar in the pack in case I bonk.
    Perhaps the key for you is finding non-sugary snacks that are tasty!

    Participant
    stevo2224 on #57419

    Hi Scott,

    You say,
    โ€œ People training a high volume (>15 hours/week) will be come fat adapted with little to no dietary restrictions. Those training under 10 hours/week can boost the fat adaptation process with some simple dietary manipulations like fasted morning aerobic workouts and restricting carbs a bit.โ€

    Could I take away from this that in general, if Iโ€™m training over 15hours a week, fasted morning aerobic work is either superfluous or unnecessarily strenuous?
    Thanks!

    Keymaster
    Scott Johnston on #57455

    Stevo;

    If you are regularly doing 15 hours/week and handling that load well you are probably pretty well fat adapted and should be able to fasted Z1-2 workouts fasted already. If that’s the case then there’s not to gain from doing more or longer fasted Z1-2 workouts.

    Scott

    Participant
    stevo2224 on #57536

    Sounds good thanks for the reply Scott. Iโ€™m comfortably in those weekly training hours so thatโ€™s good to know.

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