Haglunds Deformity and Mountain Boots

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #43035
    Richard Park
    Participant

    I’ve had a hard bump next to my heel for years now and just discovered there is actually a name for this condition. Haglund’s Deformity. Sounds dire, but I’m told it’s fairly common. Not sure if I’m just genetically predisposed to it or if it’s the result of wearing tight rock shoes, but it’s here to stay. I do notice that the size fluctuates a bit depending upon how much I’m irritating it. When it’s really inflamed I can feel my achilles tendon flaring up as well. This is not such a big deal on rock since I can take my shoes off at the belay, but slogging flat footed up slopes with mountain boots and crampons can get torturous. Front pointing not so much.

    Does anyone have experience with modifying their mountain boots or any other tips to manage this over an extended trip?

    I just purchased a sleeve with a thin gel pad in the heel area that is supposedly popular with hockey players. Haven’t had an opportunity to test it out, but will follow up once I do.

Posted In: Injury & Rehab

  • Moderator
    Scott Semple on #43050

    I don’t have this issue, but I’ve had boots fitted before. For these kinds of issues, it’s common to have boots “punched” where a ring-over-piston device increases the volume on the inside. Google “boot fitting” and you should be all set.

    Moderator
    Scott Semple on #43051

    I just noticed that this is in our Rehab category. I’m sure Pete will have some insights as well.

    Participant
    Richard Park on #43059

    Thanks Scott, I’ve seen it done for ski boots, but didn’t know it was also possible for leather as well.

    Participant
    Pete Dickinson MS,PT on #43065

    Richard,
    This is a common condition I see in nordic sports as well. Initial approach is to punch out the boots which can help A LOT! I also have patients that did the surgery to revise it in severe cases with good effect. Now, the tendon can get really inflamed from the bone tendon interface. You can treat this almost like an ‘achilles tendinitis’ with initial progression into calf raise isometrics 30-45sec x5, then progression into weighted calf raises, and finally light plyometrics.
    Punch those boots out!!
    Cheers,
    Pete

    Participant
    Richard Park on #43202

    Thanks Pete, I found a ski shop that says they can punch my boots! I’ll follow up after a trip this next week.

    Participant
    Joseph Dale on #63458

    How did punching the boots work for you, Richard?

    I’m having the same problem currently.

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