AeT treadmill workout – brisk walk vs slow jog

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #24665
    NandaDevi
    Participant

    Hi,

    I successfully used the 16 week mountaineering program to summit a non-technical peak over 6,300 m 2 months ago and it worked very well. Thank you!!!

    Now, I’m interested in implementing the 20 week intro to ultra-running program because I would like to do a 50 km trail race. I have finished two 35 km trail races in the past (though I was pathetically slow, finishing in about 6 hours each time), so I feel this is a suitable objective.
    My AeT is about 146 bpm and my AnT, when I tested it about 3 weeks ago, was 177. So I guess I have ADS. I have to do many workouts on a treadmill and often, to keep my HR < AeT, I have to slow down to the point where I can either use a slow jog or a brisk walk. In fact, I find that I can increase the treadmill speed by about 0.2 mph and use a brisk walk to get to the same HR that I would get with a slow jog! The question is, does it matter whether I choose one form of motion over the other, since the HR ends up being similar. I felt I did not need to ask this question when training for mountaineering because there walking was more event-specific.
    And how many hours of AeT/sub-AeT training would you recommend per week to raise my AeT HR?

    Thanks for your help!

  • Participant
    Rachel on #24683

    I have found that while both walking & jogging help build an aerobic base, walking/hiking does not help me get better at running. I have to run (or rather, jog very, very slowly) to see improvements, it seems to be a sports specific adaptation or something. But if you just want to improve your aerobic base, really either will work.

    I don’t know about how many hours but from what I’ve read here, it sounds like the more the better, assuming you can handle the volume.

    Keymaster
    Scott Johnston on #24686

    NandaDevi;
    Congratulations on your success.
    Rachel is correct on both counts. More volume is better when it comes to building this aerobic base. And, running even slowly will help your running more that hiking. Specificity is one of the most important factors to consider in your training. Even slow jogging mimics running better than hiking.

    Good luck.
    Scott

    Participant
    NandaDevi on #24713

    Thanks, RachelP and Scott.

    Cheers.

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