Adding to hrTSS?

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    Topic
  • #68476

    I’m still a bit confused about when we should tinker with the TSS. If I am doing a weighted hike (carrying 10% body weight up 3000ft), should I add 40TSS to the hrTSS? Or should I not be modifying the TSS if I am using hrTSS?

  • Keymaster
    Coach Maya on #68481

    You should always be using hrTSS for any aerobic/anaerobic activity! So if you did a hike with 3,000ft and 10% body weight you should add an additional 40TSS on top of your hrTSS. As long as you are consistent with the way you add TSS onto weighted uphill hikes your data will work great! This is how I calculate it additional TSS for my athletes.

    This article explains it in another way, slightly different than Carolyn and I calculate but the same exact idea with other examples: https://uphillathlete.com/aerobic-training/trainingpeaks-metrics-ctl-tss/

    I hope that helps!
    Maya

    Participant
    Pia Lichtblau on #68504

    It seems there is a link missing – which article do you refer to?

    Keymaster
    Coach Maya on #68533

    Oh no, I can see the link! I will try and post it again: https://uphillathlete.com/aerobic-training/trainingpeaks-metrics-ctl-tss/

    Did that work?

    Participant
    Janet B on #68689

    Thank you, Maya. Yes, the link was there in both posts.

    For the hike with weight, are you suggesting adding 10TSS to the hike’s hrTSS if you are carrying 10% or more of bodyweight, regardless of the length of the hike? As opposed to adding 10TSS for 10%, 20TSS for 20% of bodyweight, etc? Carrying a 15 lb pack vs. a 45 lb pack is a big difference, so I’m curious if we can/should accommodate for that.

    Makes sense to be consistent regardless of how you calculate it.
    Thanks!
    Janet

    Keymaster
    Coach Maya on #68690

    If you are carrying 20% body weight, add an additional 10TSS. If you want to add that/hour or per 1,000ft, that is up to you. I differ from that article, and I am pretty sure CP does too. I count the weight once rather than per/1,000ft, as the article says. So if you are going out for a 2hrs hike with 20% body weight and 2,000ft elevation gain, I would add 20TSS for the weight and 20TSS for the vertical. The time is accounted for based on your hrTSS, so the longer you go, the higher the number is that you add on to. For a 4hr hike with 20% body weight and 4,000vertical ft. I would add 60TSS to hrTSS. 20TSS for the weight and 40TSS for the vert.

    Make sense? Either way works, just depends on how you want to do it 🙂
    Maya

    Participant
    Janet B on #68692

    Yes, makes total sense. Thank you for spelling it out, Maya!
    Janet

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