Training times

  • Moderator
    Scott Semple on #9512

    Can you change the permissions of the G-sheet to public? Right now, permissions are required to view it.

    Or can you describe what your total weekly volume would be and what the percentages per mode would be?

    Keymaster
    Scott Johnston on #9527

    Gymbal;
    Keep in mind that the hours and the hourly progression we suggest are for the aerobic volume not including strength. This is because strength training progresses not so much by adding more time to the workout but by adding more weight (roughly speaking). So the strength workouts are stand alone out side these calculations. I understand this is not clear in the book and was the first mistake brought to our attention when the book was published. Our attempts to rectify make this mistake public have not been universally successful. When we reprint we will correct.

    Sorry,
    Scott

    Participant
    hafjell on #9607

    Gymbal,
    a year ago, I too read the book, then spent time building the perfect spreadsheet. I created my own plan as best I could by re-reading sections, sometimes two or three times. It worked ok, although, on my own, I made lots of mistakes.
    This year, I bought a structured plan, and have been impressed with the level of detail included in Training Peaks. I wonder if you wouldn’t save yourself time and energy if you learned from my mistakes. I have very little doubt now about my training weeks. I know what and when I’m supposed to be doing. The workout descriptions are very good at anticipating questions.
    Just one man’s experience.

    Participant
    gymbal on #9611

    Hi Scott,

    Thanks for the reply. Is there a recommend duration for strength sessions?

    As I had it, the transition would start off with 38% of time being zone 1, 10% of time being zone 2, 17% being climbing and 35% being strength. Should I take out climbing and strength and leave it as 4:1 zone 1 : zone 2?

    Participant
    gymbal on #9612

    Hafjell,

    Having bought two copies of the book, I would expect to be able to train without having to pay more money for a plan! And wouldn’t everyone else like to know what to do without having to pay for the information that is already in the book that they have bought?

    Participant
    hafjell on #9613

    “Is there a recommend duration for strength sessions?

    As I had it, the transition would start off with 38% of time being zone 1, 10% of time being zone 2, 17% being climbing and 35% being strength. Should I take out climbing and strength and leave it as 4:1 zone 1 : zone 2?”

    Gymbal, these questions are exactly why I recommend the training plans. I agree the “add-on” cost is a bummer for those on a tight budget. look at the plans as additive, not a replacement for a deficient book. I know I won’t convince you, so I’ll just wish you luck.

    For those who might be interested, I will say that although I’m tired from training, my anxiety about what and when and how much to train has gone to zero. Wake up, work out, get on with the day.

    Inactive
    Anonymous on #9619

    Gymbal,

    The book is not deficient, it is your understanding of the principles within; nor are you entitled to additional programs that the team has worked to put together for free. There is no hard capped time for a strength workout, it is on you to decide what you need to get out of those sessions. I encourage you to re-read the book, and explore online to answer questions that you may have. The benefit of paying for a training plan is that it shows you the theory in action so you can create your own plans in the future. I highly recommend this for someone without much of an athletic or sports science background. I also recommend TrainingPeaks as it shows weekly volume by workout type which makes it easy to track. More to your original question for example, strength workouts could include:

    10m warmup + 1h20 hangboard session
    10m warmup jog + 30m hill sprints + 10m cool down jog
    30m max strength session
    3h projecting a climbing route

    There are just so many variables in programming strength, from general to specific, that you can’t toss out a firm number. If you are just starting out with general fitness and no training background looking for an 8 week beginner climbing cycle, I would probably recommend one or two general strength sessions per week at ~30-45m per session, two climbing days for max volume of pitches to learn technique, and two running or hiking days gradually increasing volume throughout the program, but that’s just me.

    -Adam

    Participant
    joecolburn on #15057

    I have recently started a 24-week training program. I have a couple of real basic questions I’m hoping to get some advice on.

    #1 While I have done lots of running in the past, I find it difficult to take the pounding anymore. I am wondering if I can substitute cross-country skiing for the run days. If so, would you recommend the same time/distance or an increase?

    #2. I am getting ready to do the first hike/run on hilly terrain which should last for 2 hours and include 1000′ of climbing. My question is the time suggestion just for the uphill section of the hike or for the entire hike.

    Thanks.

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