Running vs. walking for AeT & sport specific motions.

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  • #13531
    Vertical Runner
    Participant

    Hi!

    I would like to ask two different questions, hope you might have an answer:

    -In addition to my everyday training, I walk 5k to get to college (most of the times in a fasted state, I only eat when I get there), then I do 5k more to get back home. I was wondering, which would have a more positive stimulus on my aerobic base, walking the 5k for 45 to 50 minutes or running those same 5k below my AeT for a little over twenty minutes?

    Also,

    -I understand that training should be sport specific. Regarding movements and motions, how can I train for uphill races (such as vertical kilometers) while keeping the intensity below my AeT, but still making sport specific motions – as running up steep hills usually entails going above my AeT? I usually power hike the uphills when trying to stay under my AeT, but considering I do almost no power hiking when racing, it isn’t very sport specific. So, should I be trying to somehow train under my AeT while still running the uphills?

    Thank you very much, have a nice weekend!
    🙂

Posted In: Mountain Running

  • Keymaster
    Scott Johnston on #13561

    If you can run to school and back I think that will be more productive training that brisk walking. The eccentric loading that occurs during running builds a very running specific type of strength that walking will not.

    Concerning the sport specific training: You are correct that movement specificity is important. However even semi-sport specific movements that model most of the muscular recruitment patterns of your main sport will be very useful. The benefits gained from cycling or swimming will not transfer to running up hill. But hiking steep hills is not much different than running then. For your aerobic base training you will be wise to keep the intensity under AeT. That does not mean you can not do any uphill running. We suggest using short (10 second) sprints, done on very steep hills to build specific leg power. Later in the base period and beginning in the specific period you can add uphill running intensity workouts as well. It will be important to maintain a high volume low intensity uphill training though.

    Scott

    Participant
    Vertical Runner on #13605

    Ok! Got it.
    Thank you Scott.

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