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Mountaineering vs. Mountain Running

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #53253
    gratmesser
    Participant

    Hi everyone,

    I’ve been searching for input on that topic for quite some time but haven’t found anything so far.

    My main mountain activities (and goals…) are a mix of mountaineering and alpine climbing in a fast and light style carrying just about enough equipment in a light pack (Even for two day trips rarely above 7-8kg).

    This doesn’t mean that it’s all about time and records but for example about doing a two day alpine objective in only one day (practical reasons: wife and kids + tons of work; You get the picture, right?).

    Further, it’s not just going uphill for hours on moderate terrain but it involves climbing in snow and ice (up to UIAA V, WI4).

    Since most of the UA mountaineering plans are cut for more „classical“ mountaineering (moderate terrain, heavy pack) and (as it seems to me) for high(er) altitude (expedition like stuff with lots of stuff to carry) I was wondering if it makes sense to substitute the hikes with easy/moderate mountain running and the weighted hill climbs (later in the programms) with some high intensity mountain running as it seems that this more specific for the activities I mentioned.

    Has anyone experience with this kind of approach?

    Thank you!

    KR,
    Fabian

Posted In: Mountaineering

  • Keymaster
    Shashi on #53274

    Fabian,

    Have you checked this training plan –

    Steve House’s 16-Week Eiger North Face Training Plan

    If you can share your training background, AeT/AnT it will help forum members provide additional feedback.

    Participant
    gratmesser on #53276

    Thanks for the reply.

    I have had a look at the mentioned plan but in the first place it seemed to be tailored for more experienced people than I am. It’s for the Heckmair route and similar top notch objectives that are not yet my choice of playground for the lack of experience and the fact that my current skills don’t allow the desired safety reserve yet. The former route I would consider my alpine life goal but with many other objectives beforehands.

    Background: 31, always pretty sporty, always active (soccer, tennis, basketball, skateboarding, hiking and also running) with the exception of about 2 years during my early studies (8 years from now) where I was lacy and partying a lot. Since then I was very active with mainly running and hiking and started with ‚real’ mountaineering/alpine climbing like 5 years ago. Since then running (uphill and flats) is my favourite thing when mountaineering is not possible. 2 years ago I did a first structured training plan and have been training for about 5-10h a Week depending on the time of the year and goals. Currently my maximum heart rate is ~200, aeT ~155 and anT ~173 (used the according Tests as outlined in the two books and the webpage several times and was able to improve, especially during the last 12 months).

    Cheers,

    Fabian

    Keymaster
    Shashi on #53277

    Fabian,

    Thanks for sharing the details.

    Although the 16-Week Eiger Plan was designed for more advanced technical objectives, I believe the underlying training principles are still the same and will help you prepare for your intermediate alpine goals.

    There was a similar discussion on Training Plan selection for Alpine objectives that you might find helpful –

    Training Plan Selection

    Please feel free to reach out to the coaches for any additional input at coach@uphillathlete.com

    Participant
    TerryLui on #53417

    What Shashi said…

    Although the 16-Week Eiger Plan was designed for more advanced technical objectives, I believe the underlying training principles are still the same and will help you prepare for your intermediate alpine goals.

    Participant
    jakedev on #53625

    Fabian,

    I have been running alot and I would say that it indeed helps me move better hiking in the mountains. The marathon plan that UA has shows how the volumes progress through the weeks. I simply do half running and half hiking. It works for me cause hiking is easier on my knees (with a light pack anyway), and I like switching things up alittle.

    I do 3 weeks of increasing volume then recovery on the 4th week.
    IE Week 1: 8 hours, Week 2 8.5 hours, Week 3: 9 hours, Week 4: 4 hours. Then rpt with 15-30 min more volume.

    Very slow progression I know but I don’t have a event or race and just want to get fitter. Once a week during the work weeks I will do a high intensity workout (ME, Z3-4) then take the recovery week off.

    There are other things in here too. Mobility, MAX maintenance, ARCing, climbing but I figure your talking about foot borne volume to start.

    It took me awhile but I think I found what works for me. Hope this helps alittle. Cheers.

    Moderator
    Scott Semple on #55252

    Sorry for the late reply.

    As Shashi suggested, I would check out the Eiger plan. It’s geared toward somewhat technical objectives and would be pretty specific to what you’ve described.

    Participant
    kurej.tomas on #55850

    Hi Fabian, have you tried that Eiger plan or something similar?

    Participant
    brandon.macmullin on #58022

    I have learned from trying and failing (mostly failing) to train for “fast and light” ascents of classic Canadian Rockies Mountaineering objectives is that there is no one size fits all approach and knowing your goal objective really matters.

    The Mountaineering plan is meant for objectives that involve carrying a heavy pack but you are talking about being done in a day and carrying little to no weight.

    If your objective is not that technical then following a trail running / race plan, something with some speed work would be better than trying to adapt a plan that is meant for something else.

    If your objective involves technical terrain / pitched climbing then the key to going fast is being good at climbing the grade and style of your objective.

    Another thing I learned is that speed in the mountains comes more from having the right partner, knowing the route, light gear, and doing things efficiently etc. than fitness.

    Moderator
    Scott Semple on #58026

    Another thing I learned is that speed in the mountains comes more from having the right partner, knowing the route, light gear, and doing things efficiently etc. than fitness.

    And being really fast comes from both.

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