Heart rate drift test pace

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #41824
    deckersdan
    Participant

    Hello! Tomorrow I plan on doing the heart rate drift test and have some questions regarding it. Which heart rate should I actually be looking at to gage as being my AeT? My current understanding is that AeT heartrate is calculated by trainingpeaks and that I should simply make sure that the Pa:HR is below 5%. Is this accurate? Also will the results of the test change based on whether I am far below or near AeT or does it not matter as long as I am within aerobic range? Thank you in advance!

  • Keymaster
    Shashi on #41826

    This article should answer your questions –

    Heart Rate Drift: A Functional Measure of Aerobic Fitness

    Once you have done the test, if your heart rate drift is less than 5%, then the initial heart rate (at the end of warmup and beginning of your test) is your AeT. When I did my test, I had no idea of my AeT. I used the MAF formula (180-Age) to get a rough estimate and then repeated the tests till I got a heart rate drift of <5%.

    Training Peaks will not calculate your AeT.

    If your initial heart rate for the test is far below AeT, I think your heart rate drift will be much lower.

    I hope this helps. Good luck with your test.

    Participant
    deckersdan on #41846

    Thank you for this reply, this cleared some stuff up. I imagine that there is a fairly large range of paces that could be considered to be well under AeT. Say I am going at snails pace and am certainly within aerobic intensity, would that not produce a different heart rate than a pace that is at the very top of my aerobic threshold?

    My fear is that if I’m not running right below my AeT (which I dont know yet) then I wont get an accurate result of this test. Am I completely misunderstanding how this works?

    Keymaster
    Shashi on #41847

    Say I am going at snails pace and am certainly within aerobic intensity, would that not produce a different heart rate than a pace that is at the very top of my aerobic threshold?

    I believe so.

    My fear is that if I’m not running right below my AeT (which I dont know yet) then I wont get an accurate result of this test. Am I completely misunderstanding how this works?

    Determining AeT is a trial and error process, so it’s okay if you don’t get an accurate result in your first test. After a couple of tries, you should have a good estimate of your AeT and then you can structure your training accordingly.

    Participant
    deckersdan on #41856

    Awesome, thank you for your help!

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