Getting weight despite training 12hrs/week

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #42560
    Dada
    Participant

    Hi guys,

    I’m just back from a scale and hit the 90kg again (185cm tall). I train in average 12 hours a week almost exclusively in Z1 (and Z2; average HR is 67% of HRmax).

    Why do I get fat?

    (To be precise, I got rid of excess body fat but not on my belly; I’m not drinking alcohol)

Posted In: Nutrition

  • Inactive
    Anonymous on #42562

    Hey Dada,

    To begin – this is a great question for our Nutrition forum! Rebecca will be able to answer with much greater authority on the nutrition end than I can. There are many factors which can influence retained body fat which go beyond training – mental/emotional stress, etc.

    But from a training standpoint, my first thought is that you’ve become too efficient in the intensity zone in which you’re training. Basically – training works! By spending so much time at that low intensity you’ve engendered a metabolic change such that your body needs to expend less calories to do the same measure of work. Without adequate training stress, there’s no demand to change, i.e. let go of potential excess adipose tissue.

    Since it sounds like you’ve done a good job of building a solid foundation of Z1/2 work with decent volume, consider increasing your moderate and high intensity load. This will increase the metabolic demand both in the workout itself but also post-workout in recovery.

    I’ve found myself in a similar situation; through the base period i keep wondering why i haven’t trimmed down, but when i start adding the more specific, high intensity and muscular endurance work i gradually come into “fighting weight”.

    Ultimately the goal is to find your body’s optimal composition – everyone is built differently so it is difficult and potentially problematic to try and apply some athletic “ideal” body composition to ourselves, though we often try! Focus on seeking your performance gains through smart training, and manage your nutrition and recovery needs in a healthy way, and your body will likely adapt in a way which suits you best.

    Sam.

    Participant
    rich.b on #42568

    A few other points to consider in addition to Sam’s points, Dada.
    1. Is that weight measurement a single occasion, or is it a systematic increase? Travel (flying being worst, although that’s not happening these days) or a saltier meal or even a pasta meal can cause 1+ kg water retention for me for c. 24 hours.
    2. Is there some change in your training that might lead to gain in muscle mass? With 2 months of skijoring this spring rather than bikejoring (which I typically count separately from ‘my’ training hours) and starting up with some skimo added 2 kg for me.
    3. Mainly just because I do not like to bring along more than I have to, up to about 3 hours of running or biking I rarely bring food or water (unless it is hot, than some water). typically these longer sessions are only a couple hours after breakfast, so I am fueled, but it happens sometimes that either i) the run/ride went longer than expected; or the time distance from breakfast is longer. While these long runs/rides go just fine (with an occasional bonk), I can be a bit hungry when I do get back in through the door. On those occasions I may over-compensate on calorie intake because of the deficit. Hunger does not always reflect what your body really needs, so it can be something to consider.

    Inactive
    Anonymous on #42588

    #moved to Nutrition

    Participant
    Dada on #42606

    Hi guys,

    Thx for your awesome answers.

    I think it is not on the nutrition side since I didn’t change my diet. The same happened 8n ski mountaineering season when I switched from Z2 to Z1.

    I started to add
    – Z4 occasionally (30s/30s; every two weeks, 3 weeks ago)
    – pickups during long Z1 hikes
    – Gym ME (week 5)
    – Static core training (since February)
    – seldomly a little fartlek in Z1 workouts (Z3/Z4 max. 5minutes; when someone is feeling superior bc he thinks he is faster than me, and I want to put him into his place 😉

    @rich

    1. I just have a scale at my parent’s house so every two weeks, I guess. Last time was 88ish. But I see your point there. I’m considering to buy a scale

    2. As described above, I added ME, static core training (had disc surgery in Jan, can’t do any dynamic excercises) and I started to fuel on long Z1 workouts (5+ hours)

    3. There is a chance that I overcompensate after longer workouts and after the back-to-back weekends. It wasn’t a problem so far, but I thougt with this training volume I can eat whatever I want.

    Best regards
    Dada

    Inactive
    Anonymous on #42615

    I think it is not on the nutrition side since I didn’t change my diet.

    It’s always an energy balance, so the nutrition side is always a factor.

    There is a chance that I overcompensate after longer workouts and after the back-to-back weekends.

    That could be. It’s a common issue because people think that…

    …with this training volume I can eat whatever I want.

    …which is never the case.

    The best summary I’ve seen comes from Asker Jeukendrup:

    How various diets work for weight loss

    So if you’re body composition is worsening, then the input is exceeding the output.

    Participant
    Kyle Brundage on #42653

    Hi Dada,

    The simplest advice I can give (because I have the same issue) is just monitor your daily calories and nutrition through something like MyFitnessPal. I get 10-12hours of aerobic volume in weekly and I am still maintaining weight at 2500 calories (178cm, 78kg) and started at 2800 2-3 months ago. I am considering dropping to 2400 (dropping no more than 100/every 2 weeks) to see how my weight goes. I worked with Rebecca Dent and we had different levels of carbs/calories based on the volume that day but I found just an even calories everyday works best for me (anyone else way hungrier on off days??) There is a sweet spot every individual has based on many factors including aerobic volume and work outs. Do not try to aggressively lose the weight though, especially training for an event you want to still be recovering properly.

    Kyle

    Inactive
    Anonymous on #42663

    Do not try to aggressively lose the weight though, especially training for an event you want to still be recovering properly.

    #thumbsup!

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