AnT change with increase AeT?

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    Topic
  • #47936
    juskojj
    Participant

    I’m curious I haven’t done an AnT because for the past 4months I’ve been working on increasing my AeT to cure my ADS.

    My question is can or does your AnT change as your AeT increases? In other words does your AnT go up the more fit you get and go down if you stop working out?

    My treadmill only goes to 10% incline is this good enough for an AnT test?

  • Keymaster
    Scott Johnston on #47961

    How do you know you have ADS if you didn’t do an AnT test? Your AnT will not go up and may in fact go down with an extended training block focusing on AeT. A 10% incline should be steep enough if you are running.

    Scott

    Participant
    juskojj on #47976

    Because before I started training I was badly out of shape and have never done any formal training in my life and other experiences I’ve done that I knew I was badly out of shape for and was whooped when I was done.

    I also just did the AnT test, it came back at 186, my last AeT was 145 or 150, I’d have to look again. So basically I need to get my AeT around 167 to be within 10% and only being able to get in 5 to 6hrs a week of training it’s going to take me a LONG time to reach that.

    Moderator
    Scott Semple on #48054

    @juskojj: Why do you think it will take a long time? Response to training is very individual.

    For example, @reedshea is a fast responder and really improved his fitness on only ~4h per week.

    Participant
    juskojj on #48062

    Because I’ve been training since the end of July, started at an AeT of around 140bpm and have only gained 5 to 10bpm in 4months of training typically getting 5 to 6hrs and for a short period in the summer getting up to 8hrs a week.

    I just don’t think I’m a fast responder.

    A long time ago I was running 12 to 13min 1.5miles until I ran with a guy who I kept pace with and he got me to 10min or 10min 30sec for the 1.5miles. I felt like I was going to die but after that it was easy and I was running longer and faster without an issue but then I stopped running and I became fat and lazy. Have lost 30lbs since my January and in better shape thanks to this training methodology but still don’t think I’ll be gaining another 15bpm anytime soon unless I start doing an AeT test every other week and seeing if I’m progessing. I tried an AeT of 155 awhile a few weeks back and I wasn’t there, my drift was greater than 5%.

    I suppose I could do another AeT test now after I spent 2 days of backpacking. Covered 15miles in less than 7hrs on day.

    Participant
    juskojj on #48076

    Also when your pace gets faster and your at a higher AeT are you still nose breathing? Or no?

    Participant
    Reed on #48086

    The discussion seems very focused on your heart rate at aerobic and anaerobic thresholds. Those are great signposts. They change, but your aerobic threshold before and after a two-day backpacking trip isn’t going to have changed. Maybe target tracking these on a quarterly or twice-yearly basis. And, the more critical metric is speed at AeT.

    If you’re getting in 6 hours of sub-aerobic-threshold training each week, that’s great! You should be able to improve for several years, if you’ve never done any structured training. You might also find other bottlenecks / low-hanging fruit in areas like strength training, mobility, diet, etc.

    There’s a quotation related to Buddhism: “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” I think the opposite might be true for endurance training. As I learn more, there are more nuances and factors to consider. (Then again, I hesitate to characterize myself as anything other than a novice endurance athlete even if I’ve read a few books.)

    Moderator
    Scott Semple on #48112

    What Reed said.

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